A border passage. Leila Ahmed’ A Border Passage 2019-01-04

A border passage Rating: 7,4/10 1088 reviews

A Border Passage: From Cairo to America

a border passage

Cut from its bed and fashioned into a pipe, the reed forever laments the living earth that it once knew, crying out, whenever life is breathed into it, its ache and its yearning and loss. Mother's pacifism, let me note here, was entirely of a piece with their sense of religion. However, his misfortunes in life start when he decides to oppose Nasser, who is the prime minister. I was enc I read this book in 2000, shortly after it appeared. The book covers three aspects of her life: her childhood in pre-revolutionary Egypt i. Ahmed now finds it harder to compose an identity with as much of her Cairo roots she would like.


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SparkNotes: A Border Passage: Context

a border passage

Every page was breathtaking, whether it was the memory of the author as a child, lying under a starlit Alexandria sky with her grandmother on the 27th night of Ramadan, waiting for angels, or her many passages about her strained yet loving relationship with her mother. She has been racially discriminated by teachers and fellow students while she was studying in western countries. As educated as she is, Ahmed never learned classic written Arab. Ahmed aspires to be a professional and views her mother with contempt for not working. But, there are also some very ugly things, like the superiority complex of some British teachers and the prejudice of the headmaster. Though she receives no direct religious instruction from these women, and her father has decided not to send her to an Islamic school, Ahmed nonetheless comes to appreciate the oral, living tradition of Islam, which, in contrast to the rigid, authoritative Islam that is handed down in texts, encompasses many interpretations. Ahmed has had a taste of the cultures practiced by the Arabs and the people in the west.

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A BORDER PASSAGE by Leila Ahmed

a border passage

Alm ost everythin g then see med to h ave i ts own beat, its own li lt: sounds that distilled the sweetness of being, others that made audible its terrors, and sounds for everything between. She takes a teaching job to support herself during the eight years! We started this interesting book in our reading group but I got caught up in too much else and, alas, it got laid by the wayside as so many books before it and since have done. I found this book interesting but I wish I had had more time to read it. This book effectively addresses the complications that exist in the crossing of different borders and cultures. Her mother seemed distant and even rejecting, and Ahmed was raised primarily by her beloved Nanny, a Croatian.

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A Border Passage Quotes and Reflections

a border passage

She decides to take upon herself the duty of enlightening the west on the positive side of the Islam religion, especially regarding its application to the women. After leaving Cambridge, Ahmed accepts a teaching position in Abu Dhabi and joins a committee to help reform education throughout the United Arab Emirates. As you can imagine, Ahmed has a hard time coping with this info. Aida finds herself in a disastrous marriage, though her father won't allow her to divorce. Leila Ahmed's reflections on her childhood her relationship with her mother, her experiences in different women's spaces - an upper middle-class family in mid-century Cairo; an all women's college in Cambridge sets the terrain for some fascinating and nuanced sociopolitical analysis on the differences between oral and written Islamic cultures; reflections on how Egyptians become Arabs. It reflects the formative moments of Leila Ahmed's life while simultaneously investigating questions of imperialism, culture, religion, identity, feminism, race, literacy, politics, literature, Egypt, and Arabness at a level exceptionally perceptive and thorough.

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SparkNotes: A Border Passage: Context

a border passage

Price, who accuses her of plagiarizing her own well-written essays. I thought it was their fault, that they could have done something. Then there was the sound sometim es, in the earli est morni ng, of the reed piper walking past our house. For of those miles, fencing separates the two countries from each other. Karima was orphaned as a child and inherited enough money to live comfortably and independently. Leila Ahmed is a terrific writer, but I have the same problems with her memoir that I have with memoirs in general. Returning to England for grad school was a different story.

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US

a border passage

As a young child, Ahmed is very attached to Nanny, her Croatian governess. This entire memoir is like an impressionist painting. As a young child, Ahmed is very attached to Nanny, her Croatian governess. Father is dying, the garden is in shambles—and so are their finances. A woman born in 1940 in Cairo into relative privilege and educated at Cambridge University as Egypt was undergoing radical political change, Ahmed eventually finds herself as an expatriate academic in New England in 1981.

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A Border Passage

a border passage

Although it is well-written, the subject is very boring. The E-mail message field is required. Ahmed is soon headed to Cambridge, England, to study literature, a place she reveres as an intellectual wonderland and the embodiment of all the things she remembers reading in English books as a child—forests, fog, turrets, and towers. The people who live in the border counties on each side of the line have watched for years as security grew tighter and illegal crossings tapered off. This shows how her early life, which involved reading a lot of material from the west, influenced her even to the point of writing a dissertation on someone she was aware was disliked by the Arab nationalists. I would go to bed looking forward to finding out what had happened next in their lives. Ahmed is perhaps envious of this relationship, one in which her mother offers wise and even-handed advice.

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A Border williballenthin.com

a border passage

However, she does find her new environment exciting and intellectually stimulating, and even as she endeavors to make a contribution to her the world of ideas in her new home, she never turns her back on her Egyptian heritage. Why are you crying now? And in spite of the fact that I am also unused to reading books that challenge my intellect, I found the effort very worth while. It reflects the formative moments of Leila Ahmed's life while simultaneously investigating questions of imperialism, culture, religion, identity, feminism, race, literacy, politics, literature, Egypt, and Arabness at a level exceptionally perceptive and thorough. I don't know why this bothers me but it does. In her memoir, she reviews her life beginning in Cairo where she was born in 1940, being You know how they say there is a right time to read a certain book? She doesn't even know where to begin.

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