A stage where every man must play a part. I Hold The World But As The World, Gratiano, 2018-12-22

A stage where every man must play a part Rating: 4,6/10 1639 reviews

All The World's A Stage Poem by William Shakespeare

a stage where every man must play a part

The sixth age shifts Into the lean and slippered pantaloon, With spectacles on nose and pouch on side; His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide For his shrunk shank, and his big manly voice, Turning again toward childish treble, pipes And whistles in his sound. Good signiors both, when shall we laugh? At first, the infant, Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms. My Lord Bassanio, since you have found Antonio, We two will leave you: but at dinner-time, 75 I pray you, have in mind where we must meet. Original Text Translated Text Source: Enter Antonio, Salarino, and Solanio. London: Printed by , and. The Ages of Man: A Study in Medieval Writing and Thought.

Next

Lesson 11: “A Stage, Where Every Man Must Play a Part” (Act 1, Scene 1)

a stage where every man must play a part

So he's covered—or so he thinks. Autoplay next video All the world's a stage, And all the men and women merely players; They have their exits and their entrances, And one man in his time plays many parts, His acts being seven ages. His reasons are as two grains of wheat hid in two bushels of chaff: you shall seek all day ere you find them, and when you have them, they are not worth the search. All the world's a stage, And all the men and women merely players; They have their exits and their entrances, And one man in his time plays many parts, His acts being seven ages. Even if some ships fail, others are bound to make it. Thou know'st that all my fortunes are at sea; Neither have I money nor commodity 185 To raise a present sum: therefore go forth; Try what my credit can in Venice do: That shall be rack'd, even to the uttermost, To furnish thee to Belmont, to fair Portia. Which, hearing them, would call their brothers fools.

Next

hold the world as the world ..., a stage, where every man must play a Credits

a stage where every man must play a part

I should be still Plucking the grass, to know where sits the wind, Peering in maps for ports and piers and roads; 20 And every object that might make me fear Misfortune to my ventures, out of doubt Would make me sad. I tell thee what, Antonio-- I love thee, and it is my love that speaks-- There are a sort of men whose visages Do cream and mantle like a standing pond, And do a wilful stillness entertain, With purpose to be dress'd in an opinion Of wisdom, gravity, profound conceit, As who should say 'I am Sir Oracle, And when I ope my lips let no dog bark! Yup: here comes the waxing. I know a lot of men like that, Antonio. Why should any living man sit still like a statue? Go, presently inquire, and so will I, 190 Where money is, and I no question make To have it of my trust or for my sake. When it was founded in 1599 Shakespeare's own theatre, , may have used the motto Totus mundus agit histrionem All the world plays the actor , the Latin text of which is derived from a 12th-century treatise.

Next

The Merchant of Venice: Act 1, Scene 1

a stage where every man must play a part

I will not fail you. We'll make our leisures to attend on yours. His reasons are as two grains of wheat hid in two bushels of chaff: you shall seek all day ere you find them, and when you have them, they are not worth the search. William Shakespeare , , , , ,. Why should a man, whose blood is warm within, Sit like his grandsire cut in alabaster? Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel And shining morning face, creeping like snail Unwillingly to school. Queen Elizabeth I James Burbage William Shakespeare Sir Walter Raleigh Christopher Marlowe Other characters With your character and role clear, you will find out more about specific aspects of the time to complete your task.

Next

All the world's a stage

a stage where every man must play a part

Why should a man, whose blood is warm within, Sit like his grandsire cut in alabaster? After making this long-winded point about short-winded people, Gratiano exits with Lorenzo, leaving Bassanio and Antonio to talk. Antonio is a sad bunny, though he claims he doesn't know why. And then the lover, Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Their faces never move or show any expression, like stagnant ponds covered with scum. Then let us say you are sad Because you are not merry: and 'twere as easy For you to laugh and leap and say you are merry, Because you are not sad. I tell thee what, Antonio— I love thee, and it is my love that speaks— There are a sort of men whose visages Do cream and mantle like a standing pond, 95 And do a wilful stillness entertain, With purpose to be dress'd in an opinion Of wisdom, gravity, profound conceit, As who should say 'I am Sir Oracle, And when I ope my lips let no dog bark! Or, as it were, the pageants of the sea, Do overpeer the petty traffickers, That cur'sy to them, do them reverence, As they fly by them with their woven wings. Shall I have the thought To think on this, and shall I lack the thought That such a thing bechanced would make me sad? Then a soldier, Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard, Jealous in honour, sudden and quick in quarrel, Seeking the bubble reputation Even in the cannon's mouth.

Next

I Hold The World But As The World, Gratiano,

a stage where every man must play a part

Fare ye well awhile: I'll end my exhortation after dinner. Gratiano speaks an infinite deal of nothing, more than any man in all Venice. Antonio supports this scheme, but unfortunately all of his money is tied up in his sea ventures. O my Antonio, had I but the means To hold a rival place with one of them, I have a mind presages me such thrift, That I should questionless be fortunate! At first, the infant, Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms. Could this be the cause of Antonio's sadness? I tell thee what, Antonio— I love thee, and it is my love that speaks— There are a sort of men whose visages Do cream and mantle like a standing pond, And do a wilful stillness entertain, With purpose to be dress'd in an opinion Of wisdom, gravity, profound conceit, As who should say 'I am Sir Oracle, And when I ope my lips let no dog bark! Shall I have the thought To think on this, and shall I lack the thought That such a thing bechanced would make me sad? My wind cooling my broth Would blow me to an ague, when I thought 25 What harm a wind too great at sea might do. Then a soldier, Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard, Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in quarrel, Seeking the bubble reputation Even in the cannon's mouth.

Next

RhymeZone: Shakespeare > Comedies > The Merchant of Venice > Act I, scene I

a stage where every man must play a part

Farewell: I'll grow a talker for this gear. Sleep when he wakes and creep into the jaundice By being peevish? With mirth and laughter let old wrinkles come, 85 And let my liver rather heat with wine Than my heart cool with mortifying groans. To you, Antonio, I owe the most, in money and in love, And from your love I have a warranty To unburden all my plots and purposes How to get clear of all the debts I owe. Now, by two-headed Janus, Nature hath framed strange fellows in her time: Some that will evermore peep through their eyes And laugh like parrots at a bag-piper, And other of such vinegar aspect That they'll not show their teeth in way of smile, 56. I take it, your own business calls on you And you embrace the occasion to depart.

Next

All The World's A Stage Poem by William Shakespeare

a stage where every man must play a part

Shall I have the thought To think on this, and shall I lack the thought That such a thing bechanced would make me sad? Like the others, he elects not to cheer his friend. His ships are out there with goods; if they make it back safely, he'll be rich—but if they don't, he'll be in trouble. Now, by two-headed Janus, Nature hath framed strange fellows in her time: Some that will evermore peep through their eyes And laugh like parrots at a bag-piper, And other of such vinegar aspect That they'll not show their teeth in way of smile, Though Nestor swear the jest be laughable. This WebQuest was created in. And then the justice, In fair round belly with good capon lined, With eyes severe and beard of formal cut, Full of wise saws and modern instances; And so he plays his part.

Next

I hold the world but as the world, Gratiano; A stage where every man must play a part, And mine is a sad one. William Shakespeare Facebook Quote Cover #13744

a stage where every man must play a part

The seven ages model dates from the 12th century. All the world's a stage, And all the men and women merely players; Last scene of all, That ends this strange eventful history, Is second childishness and mere oblivion, Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything. And then the lover, Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad Made to his mistress' eyebrow. I would have stay'd till I had made you merry, 68. And then the justice, In fair round belly with good capon lined, With eyes severe and beard of formal cut, Full of wise saws and modern instances; And so he plays his part. I owe you much, and, like a wilful youth, That which I owe is lost; but if you please To shoot another arrow that self way Which you did shoot the first, I do not doubt, As I will watch the aim, or to find both Or bring your latter hazard back again And thankfully rest debtor for the first.

Next

Lesson 11: “A Stage, Where Every Man Must Play a Part” (Act 1, Scene 1)

a stage where every man must play a part

Groans and sighs were thought to draw blood from the heart. And mine a sad one. But my chief care Is to come fairly off from the great debts 135 Wherein my time, something too prodigal, Hath left me gaged. O my Antonio, had I but the means 180 To hold a rival place with one of them, I have a mind presages me such thrift, That I should questionless be fortunate! Believe me, sir, had I such venture forth, The better part of my affections would Be with my hopes abroad. You grow exceeding strange: must it be so? William Shakespeare I hold the world but as the world, Profile Facebook Covers I Hold The World But As The World, Gratiano; A Stage Where Every Man Must Play A Part, And Mine Is A Sad One.

Next