What is the poem funeral blues about. Funeral Blues 2018-12-23

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Analysis of Funeral Blues by W.H. Auden

what is the poem funeral blues about

It represents purity and peace which draws us back to the narrators desire for quiet. Suggesting that a plane could use its chem. However, I've always seen it as ironic. Auden uses first person to build a direct connection between the readers and the poem, and this also makes the poem a strong and emotional one. Funeral Blues Analysis First stanza Stop all the clocks, cut off the telephone, Prevent the dog from barking with a juicy bone, Silence the pianos and with muffled drum Bring out the coffin, let the mourners come. It is not altogether surprising to read such a poem from Auden, given it is not the only one he wrote of the variety. Day Lewis, and Stephen Spender.


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Comparison of the Poems

what is the poem funeral blues about

The despair flows through to the very end of the poem. Though are other themes contained in the poem, death is the main and overarching theme. There is only one stanza that does not follow the pattern of expanding. Let aeroplanes circle moaning overhead Scribbling on the sky the message 'He is Dead'. This theme continues as they then talk about further dismantling the heavens. Wystan Hugh Auden was born in York, England, in 1907. The effect on the audience is rather strong, as they understand the situation and instead of sympathising with the students, laugh along with the teacher who is punishing them.

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Funeral Blues, a poem by W. H. Auden at williballenthin.com

what is the poem funeral blues about

The Dove is a powerful icon, especially from a religious stand point. The singing is accompanied not only by instrumentals, but often also by. The speaker asks for quiet. But this is faintly absurd. Let aeroplanes circle moaning overhead Scribbling on the sky the message He is Dead.

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What are the poem funeral blues from W.H. Auden about?

what is the poem funeral blues about

We hope you found this analysis instructive. Both the first and second stanza give one the impression that the narrator might be mocking the event. The 1936 version was a satiric poem of mourning for a political leader, written for the verse play , by Auden and. There is a sense that no matter what happens, the grief is too big for any funeral to adequately cover it. This is done via a fascinating juxtaposition. Here, the speaker goes more into figurative language. Still, we wonder if words just aren't quite enough.


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Analysis of Funeral Blues by W.H. Auden

what is the poem funeral blues about

Put crepe bows round the white necks of the public doves, Let the traffic policemen wear black cotton gloves. He was my North, my South, my East and West, My working week and my Sunday rest, My noon, my midnight, my talk, my song; If the strong love the speaker felt toward the deceased was not clear until now, the reader simply cannot miss it at this point. At the end of this poem, Audin personifies the sun, moon, ocean, and woods; he does not see any point in there beauty 1219 Words 5 Pages Both Wilfred Owen and W. The poem — and the work of W. A place to think, to laugh, to shed a tear. The opening line references the points of a compass the suggestion of these being missing effectively says that the narrator is lacks direction with their loved one.

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Funeral Blues, a poem by W. H. Auden at williballenthin.com

what is the poem funeral blues about

Structure Even from the title, one can deduce the poem is an elegy. The poem is written in close focus third person and zooms… 1464 Words 6 Pages Citizen by W. Wearing black gloves would be a sign of respect to the departed. He doesn't want to see the stars, the moon, or the sun. Even the first three lines in the third stanza were a bit like perfunctory things a person must say at funeral. It is indeed a time of loss and sorrow.


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Funeral Blues by W. H. Auden

what is the poem funeral blues about

Now that the dead man is gone, there is no good left in the world. It suggests that even the natural world seems fake and unreal now that the joys of the world have been taken from him. We try with a vengeance to impose the normal, when what we most want to do is to hide the fact that things are not normal at all. He was my North, my South, my East and West, My working week and my Sunday rest, My noon, my midnight, my talk, my song; I thought that love would last forever: I was wrong. In fact, town and city life is something of an endurance test to me.


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Funeral Blues, a poem by W. H. Auden at williballenthin.com

what is the poem funeral blues about

May I take this opportunity to share with you, this work by emerging artist, Nemo Shaw. Figuratively, it is an echo of how the speaker feels and perceives the world around him at this moment in time. The first few lines, for example, suggest a desire to escape the noise and clamour the clocks, the telephones and the barking dogs of modern life, a desire often associated with mourning. Why is the narrator making such exaggerated requests? The silence experienced by the reader parallels the same silence sought out or felt by the speaker. The speaker ends the poem with how nothing matters to him anymore, as nothing can take him back to the past.

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Funeral Blues Analysis

what is the poem funeral blues about

He says that doves should wear white ribbons and that policemen should wear black gloves to commemorate the death. Unfortunately, death cannot be escaped. The narrative of this poem is that Porphyria was seeing someone below her own social class and no one knew about their relationship. Stop all the clocks, cut off the telephone, Prevent the dog from barking with a juicy bone, Silence the pianos and with muffled drum Bring out the coffin, let the mourners come. The speaker is unquestionably and directly telling the reader the deceased person was everything to him.

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